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Work on new classroom due to start Aug 12 to be ready for September 12 new term

Waymarks Education Centre, Moi's Bridge, Kenya

A small school serving an area of deprivation in rural town where the less than $1 a day poverty level afflicts the majority of people in the community

The centre currently caters for 200 children. Three quarters  of  these  children have lost one or both parents. All live in poverty. Many homes lack blankets for the children to sleep under. Even providing basic clothing can be a challenge for those caring for the children.

At the Centre they get food - breakfast Lunch (main meal of day) and tea. For many of the children the only food they get is what is provided by the school. There is of course a good education and such simple basics as tooth brushes and tooth paste. The centre opens at 7:30 in the morning and closes at 5pm. This is the routine from Monday to Saturday. On Sunday there is church and Sunday school plus a meal.

The main source of support and funding initially  was coming  from 3 churches in Kenya. Church members gave  food, money, clothes and time to keep the Centre open. The post election violence that hit Kenya in 2008 it changed peoples circumstances and their ability to give in the way they did prior to the problems. As a result the Centre was finding it hard to keep up itís programme of education and the provision of basics like food. Other casualties include basic maintenance of latrines, furniture and educational materials such as books and pencils.
Peter and Edwina heard their plight and as a result Aid2Africa decided  to step in to  help the Centre.

 There is basic education provided  at both nursery and primary level. In 2009 jointly we managed to get the school to the required standard and was  officially registered. Since 2011 ,children in grade 8 have been  able to take the national school certificate examinations. Few children have any chance of progressing to secondary school due to lack of school fees.

 We have been able to fund  Secondary  fees for only 4 girls this year . Prayerfully we hope that the number of those joining Secondary school will go up in the coming year if God provides funding for this.

July 2015


Moi's Bridge is in Western Kenya on the edge of the Rift Valley administrative area.

Security Issues
over the past year or so there have been a number of issues relating to the security of the school and its site. Poverty sadly breeds crime. To counter this threat, we have invested in replacing the existing fences and gates with more substantial structures and in October we will be planting a living thorn hedge alongside the new fencing. Below and in the column to the right are some photos of the work which has just been completed (July 2012)
Click here for the full set of photos.

July 2012, a message from Maurice who founded the school and now acts as the A2A rep in Kenya and oversees the work funded by A2A

"We Thank God for prayers answered. Speaking sincerely,  Support from A2A has made a great difference in the lives of the needy and orphans at WEC. Children are happily getting  basic education at Nursery and Primary level. The support provides meals, schooling materials and for some accommodation too alongside the other support. Children are growing up in a more godly way with lots of hope and expectations of becoming very important persons in the society  in the future. Therefore, we wish to convey our most heartfelt appreciations to everyone donating to A2A and supporting this noble work in Moi's Bridge, Kenya."
May God Bless all of you for  your  continued Love, Prayers and Generous support.

Pastor Maurice Chesoli

work on the stream to reduce flooding to the lower side of the site is more or less finished now (Aug 12) Before and then work in progress

The Children's Home was part of our response to a growing problem of neglect and abuse for some of the children made homeless when the slum was demolished.

     
     

 






 

Digging a well at the new school site in 2009

Digging a well at the new school site

digging the well was the first thing we did at the new site


capping the well to prevent contamination is important

 

 

 

At the Centre they get food and education and such simple basics as tooth brushes and tooth paste. The centre opens at 7:30 in the morning and closes at 5pm. This is the routine from Monday to Saturday. On Sunday there is church and Sunday school plus a meal. 
 There is basic education provide at both nursery and primary level. In 2009 we managed to get the school to the required standard to be officially registered. This mean that the children in grade 8 will be able to take the national school certificate examinations Few children have any chance of progressing to secondary school.
The main source of support and funding has come from 3 churches in Kenya. Church members have given food, money, clothes and time to keep the Centre open.
The post election violence that hit Kenya in 2008 it changed peoples circumstances and their ability to give in the way they did prior to the problems. As a result the Centre is finding it hard to keep up itís programme of education and the provision of basics like food.
Other casualties include basic maintenance of latrines, furniture and educational materials such as books and pencils. 

We heard about the centre and its plight. We are now working with Maurice and his team to not just get back to where they were, but to move on and build a school on its own land with enough accommodation for three time the number it presently caters for.

June 2012

 

 

new classrooms being built on the land
we are purchasing

putting the roof onto the new classrooms
the old classrooms and the new
the old school which we moved out of to the new site in january 2010 The new school site was opened in autumn 2009
the old kitchen and the new
this kitchen served 90 children with food twice a day..... This is the kitchen A2A built on the new site to replace the old kitchen
Kambi Suswa slums and children we want to get
into school when it has the capacity
in October 2009 more than 100 children in the local slum had no school place in 2010 an additional 85 places had been created at the school
the furniture maker and the market
all the schools furnituer is made locally every day there is a small market but  Monday is the main market day
The market and our maize fields
in an area where subsistence farming is the main occupation people try to sell any surplus produce growing maize is one of our sustainable projects. the profit goes to help pay for the day to day running of the school
inside an old classroom
nostalgic photo of pupils in the old school.